Nature and Us: Thank you!

Thank you for your support during my project. I have enjoyed doing all the research hand sharing what I have found. I hope you enjoyed it!

Advertisements

I have learnt so many things during this project. I learnt about Forest bathing and the benefits about being surrounded by all that green…

Click the link below to see this post:

(Nature and Us: Forests )

…Jathilda shared he experience and joy with nature as a child. Then…

Click the link below to see this post:

(Nature and Us: Jathilda)

…we discovered how important bugs and beetles are to the eco system! Also, how cute they are!

Click the link below to see this post:

(Nature and US: Bugs and Beetles)

Twitter user Goldfinch shared there love for Nature too by sending a submission in!

Click the link below to see this post:

(Nature and Us: Goldfinch)

The wildlife that depend on the ice caps that exist in Greenland. More importantly, how the icecaps influence the rest of the earth and how they keep a balance.

Advertisements

And lastly…

Click the link below to see this post:

(Nature and Us: Frozen )

…the distressing industry of the Shark finning world.

Click the link below to see this post:

(Nature and Us: Shark Fin Soup)

I have really enjoyed this project. I will be honest, I did struggle a little haha but I feel better after learning more about our Earth and ways I can personally help in this.

Is there any project you would be interested in seeing in the future? I would be really interested in hearing your opinion.

Thank you for your reading and subscribing as always, have a great day!!!


Advertisements
One-Time
Monthly
Yearly

Make a one-time donation

Make a monthly donation

Make a yearly donation

Choose an amount

£5.00
£10.00
£15.00
£3.00
£9.00
£60.00
£3.00
£9.00
£60.00

Or enter a custom amount

£

Your contribution is appreciated. It will help me do more interesting things for you to read about.

Your contribution is appreciated.

Your contribution is appreciated.

DonateDonate monthlyDonate yearly

Nature and Us: Shark Fin Soup

Shark Fin Soup is a traditional soup that is part of Chinese cuisine. The shark fins provide texture and then the taste comes from the other soup ingredients. It is most commonly served at special occasions such as weddings and banquets, or as a luxury item.

The cartilage in the fins are usually shredded and used to thicken the soup. It embodies good luck, or good fortune. But why are warnings given about eating this dish? And what impact does this have on the population of sharks?

Advertisements

Mercury.

According to ScienceDirect, there is Mercury and arsenic in processed fins from nine of the most traded shark species in the Hong Kong and China dried seafood markets. A team discovered that the food being consumed by the people contains high levels of mercury that is actually legally considered unsafe for humans.

According to a 2018 report by Marine Policy, more than 1 million tons of shark product are caught each year. This translates to about 100 million sharks that are killed per year

Shark Soup

Affect on the shark

After their fins have been cut off, sharks are able to survive a little while, however because they cannot move to filter oxygen through their gills, they sink to the bottom of the ocean and die in excruciating pain either due to lack of oxygen or hunger, often both.

It is sickening to think that millions of sharks are subjected to this each year. How can this amount of pain be a sign of good luck for a human, regardless of traditions?

Advertisements

Affect on the environment

Shark populations have significantly decreased over the previous years, and no doubt! The amount of sharks harvested and lack of selection deplete the populations faster than they can reproduce.

Up to 99% of the shark is wasted.

What is being done to stop the cruelty?

Some steps have been taken to stop the pain. Bans have been made but in order for these bans to work, they need to be enforced. Here are just 2 of the bans that have been made in the US:

(Source.) Bear in mind the shark above is likely alive, in pain and is drowning.

What can you do?

Aside from the obvious, (Not eating the soup), one way is to sign this petition: Sign the No Shark Pledge.

Humane Society International have a form to sign that means you can show your support for those who are against this form of cruelty.

There is also a campaign being held by the Shark trust where you can either donate or fundraise!


To read more about why I have decided to talk about this, head on over to my Nature and Us page. Also subscribe to my site below.

Nature and Us: Frozen

No sorry. I am not talking about The Disney film Frozen. If you were looking for that you’re going to be disappointed. But don’t leave yet! I want to chat about Ice caps.

What is an Ice cap? According to the National Snow and Ice Data Center, it is a dome-like sheet of ice that covers the lands features and it can spread for kilometers in all directions.

Almost 10% of the worlds land mass is covered in frozen water in Glacier’s and ice caps. Why are they so important though, are they useful to the environment? and what is the effect climate change is having on them?

First of all, lets delve into why they are beneficial.

Useful or useless?

There is a paper written by Pal Prestrud for the International Climate and Environmental Research Centre in Oslo, Norway.

They spoke about the importance of snow and ice. Here is a quote from their paper:

The global significance of ice and snow is profound. Less ice, snow and permafrost may amplify global warming in various ways. Melting glaciers and ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica will raise the mean sea level. The retreating sea ice, in combination with increased supply of fresh water from melting glaciers and warmer ocean temperatures, could affect the strength of major ocean currents.

Pal Prestrud

This could spell disaster for many countries who depend on the slow melt from the glaciers, carried by rivers to support their agriculture and domestic water supplies. If their water source just disappears, the people who need this water will suffer greatly.

Animals in Greeenland

Polar bears, Humpback wales, Musk Oxen, Walruses, Reindeer and White,tailed eagles. They all live either on the land, sea or in the air surrounding Greenland.

A White-Tailed Eagle and A Musk Oxen.

I was amazed to find that Greenland has the worlds largest national park, and that actually, the animals have a larger domain than the islanders who live there. Because the park is so big, it means that the animals can roam undisturbed by unwanted human visitors. But despite the paradisiac wilderness, a significant part of the Greenland ice sheet is on the brink of a tipping point. What does this mean?

Melting its ice sheet completely would eventually raise global sea level by 7 metres. In the event this happens, the Netherlands would be completely wiped out. Denmark would become much smaller, the Polynesian islands would be submerged. Miami & Tokyo would be rendered uninhabitable.

As a rule of thumb, for every centimetre rise in global sea level, another 6 million people are exposed to coastal flooding around the planet. On current trends, Greenland ice melting will cause 100 million people to be flooded each year by the end of the century, so 400 million in total due to sea level rise.

Andrew Shepherd. NASA, scientist from university of Leeds. (Source)

So we have covered what they are, why they’re useful and what the affect climate change is having on the glaciers and icecaps. Now, we are going to discuss what can we do to help?

Do your part.

  • Speak up. You can take a stand in protecting the planet by writing to government officials to stop endangering our eco system. You can take action here: Actions | NRDC
  • Reduce water waste. So take shorter showers, turn off the tap if your’e not using it. (The EPA estimates that if just one out of every 100 American homes were fitted with water-efficient fixtures, about 100 million kilowatt-hours of electricity per year would be saved—avoiding 80,000 tons of global warming pollution.)
  • Eat the food you buy…eat less meat. Since livestock products are among the most resource-intensive to produce, eating meat-free meals can make a big difference, too. The amount of in-date food that goes into landfills in America each year could actually feed whole villages in 3rd world countries like India.
  • Walk or bike. Do not drive if you don’t have to. If your destination is 5 mins away in the car, use the opportunity to get the exercise and walk or cycle, if you are able to. You could even make use of public transport!

If you are interested in learning more, head on over to the NRDC website and have a look at the different articles available.

Thank you for listening.


If you would like to join in on this project, head on over to this page to learn more! I would love it if you joined in.