Murder in the crows

Hug the tree, feel the knots leave your body.

Hear the wood creak, the wind whistle.

The leaves sway.

Walk on the forest floor,

among long ferns.

The damp, cold moss underfoot.

Shoots of green peeking through,

glimpses of the future spring yet to come.

Feel the mist creeping,

sneaking quietly.

Closing in on you, suffocating you in a blanket of cold.

Deliciously all alone, in the sea of trees.

“Am I the only one here?”,

You say to anyone.


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You’re not by yourself.

The crows call to you.

Their language escaping you.

They cry out, dodging the branches as they dive down,

You look to see them, staring at you.

This is their calm. Not yours.

Suddenly, like a wave of panic,

Squawking, scrapping, feathers and claws.

The grey of the sky smeared now with black.

Murder in the air.


I wanted to write something a little differently today. I am not sure where I was going with it, but the gist of it was about stealing the calm. You walk into a calm and you start taking it when it doesn’t belong to you. It is a poem slash short story. I hope you enjoyed it haha.

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Colliers Moss Common

This area was once one of the most industrial in the country, now it is a treasured part of St Helens, covered in trees and wildlife. What changed?

Bold Heritage

First of all, what is peat? It is dead compacted moss land. An industry was created in which turf cutters dug trenches to remove the peat which was then built into an array of thousands of pyramids spanning between 3 and 12 feet tall.

In 1955 the NCB, the National Coal Board, completed a £5.5 million investment into Bold Colliery.

The mine that was nearby was one of the most modern pits in all of Lancashire, with 1800 workers.

Sadly, there is such a thing called spoil with mining and this was more often than not just dirt mixed with rock and shale. It was taken by railway and offloaded onto Bold Moss. 23 years worth of this stuff equates to around 9 million tons. It caused massive environmental damage.

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Things started to change in 1978. The artificial hill that was made up of the mine’s sludge and the power station’s ash, reached a maximum height and the dumping stopped.

The Colliery stopped production in ’85 and 5 years after, British Coal agreed to the sell the site in order to restore it.

What had happened to the grounds as a result?

Well, during the 90’s, lots of work was undertaken to help ease the affects of the environmental damage that all those years of dumping had had on the land. Unfortunately, the soil was then very acidic which made it very hard for the plants to regrow.

Machines were used to loosen the soil, and then after lime & fertiliser had been introduced, grass heather and wildflower seeds were planted along with trees.

What is it like now?

The site is now a haven for wildlife and plants. Colonies of Orchids have spread on the common and new species of wildlife is arriving every year.

This is just one example of what is capable if spaces that were once abused, are looked after and restored to what they once were.

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Life Update: Moving to Royal Birkdale

So me and my family have recently moved house, from the dump that St Helens was, and moved to Sunny Southport. It is why my posts haven’t been the most reliable or consistent. We are slowly getting used to it. It is nice to live somewhere where the neighbours will call out good morning to…

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Murder in the crows

Hug the tree, feel the knots leave your body. Hear the wood creak, the wind whistle. The leaves sway. Walk on the forest floor, among long ferns. The damp, cold moss underfoot. Shoots of green peeking through, glimpses of the future spring yet to come. Feel the mist creeping, sneaking quietly. Closing in on you,…

Keep reading

Chicken Makhani

Serves: 4 • Cooking time: 30 mins • Vegetarian alternative: Swap Chicken for Broccli. • What you need: 4 Chicken Thighs 1 tin of Coconut Milk 2 knobbs of butter 1 onion Olive Oil 1 can of chopped tomatoes. Seasoning: 1 Tsp Ground Coriander 1 Tsp Paprika 1 Tsp Cumin 1 Tsp Garlic Powder 1…

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Banana and Apple Smoothie

So, I recently started making this for when I feel I want a smoothie, but I don’t want all the hassle of loads of different ingredients. With this one, you are most likely to have these 3 main ingredients and even if you don’t have the others, it is still tasty and uplifting Ingredients: Main:…

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Cranberry and Raisin Soda Bread

Really easy and went down a treat in my house! It was eaten very quickly haha. This loaf is perfect spread with salty butter accompanied with a cuppa tea. You don’t need to be a pro baker to make this one! Ingredients: 1 1/2 plain flour 2 1/2 cups of bread flour for seedy bread.…

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Lockdown, COVID & Travel.

(Updated information) 16th March 2020. The UK prime minister announces a ban on nonessential travel and contact. On the 26th, the first lockdown commences. Nonessential shops are closed. Students confined to accommodation. Flights are grounded. Shops run out of toilet roll as a result of panic buying. Dolphins return to Blackpool in the North. The…

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Isle of Arran

My best friends family took me on their holiday to the Isle of Arran just before lockdown in the UK. Sadly, we weren’t able to travel all over the Island however we did visit the island’s main town – Brodick. Where is Arran? Isle of Arran is situated in the Firth of Clyde, Scotland. Brodick…

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Isle of Man – Cregneash

Cregneash Cregneash is a small village and tourist destination in the south-west part of the Isle of Man, about 1 mi from Port Erin. Most of the village is now part of a living museum run by Manx National Heritage, and overlooks the beautiful blue sea! Cregneash is a living illustration of a farming and…

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The Needles, Isle of Wight

The history of the Isle of Wight dates back to the Iron Age, with much evidence of settlement being discovered through archaeology and ancient structures which still stand today.  The Needles History The Battery This military battery was built in 1861 to 1863, and its purpose was to protect the West end of the Solent…

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Danes Dyke

Danes Dyke is a nature reserve in Yorkshire, known for the wildlife that are here and the fantastic pebble beach. The coastline here is so special it is actually a protected Site of Special Scientific Interest and its seabird colonies mark it as a Special Protection Area. Where does it get its name from? “Danes…

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Steam Railways

We were on holiday on the Isle of Wight not long ago and were taken to a a place called Ryde. Here, they have a fully functional steam railway! The steam railway is only 5 miles long, which is only a small fraction of the once stretched over 55 miles long. How did it all…

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Isle of Arran

My best friends family took me on their holiday to the Isle of Arran just before lockdown in the UK.

Sadly, we weren’t able to travel all over the Island however we did visit the island’s main town – Brodick.

Where is Arran?

Isle of Arran is situated in the Firth of Clyde, Scotland. Brodick is halfway along the east coast of the island, and this village has a population of 621.

Brodick receives the Islands ferries that come across from Ardrossan in Scotland. It doesn’t take ages to travel on this ferry. From what I remember it was roughly 45 mins to an hour. It was a calm crossing when we went but it was incredibly windy.

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828,262 passengers and 202,843 cars travelled on this ferry in 2016

Brodick

Brodick has much economic activity. There are many family-owned business and tourist attractions such as the Auchrannie Spa and Resort, where we stayed.

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Isle of Man – Cregneash

Cregneash

Cregneash is a small village and tourist destination in the south-west part of the Isle of Man, about 1 mi from Port Erin. Most of the village is now part of a living museum run by Manx National Heritage, and overlooks the beautiful blue sea!

Cregneash is a living illustration of a farming and crofting community in the 19th and early 20th century. You can see plough horses, Loghtan sheep, shorthorn cows and Manx cats.

Manx cats?

Manx cats walk all around the little village. “The Manx cat’s lack of tail is the result of a genetic mutation possibly caused by inbreeding among the small population of British Shorthairs on the Isle of Man. The true or ‘rumpy’ Manx has only a small hollow where the tail would have been, although cats with residual tails are born.”ICC

Cregneash opening times:

Open Tuesday – Saturday, 9.30am – 3.30pm

Site closes for the Season on 17 November 2021.


This is one of my favourite tourist attractions on the Isle of Man! I haven’t included a lot here but if you have the opportunity, take it. It will be well worth your trip!

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Danes Dyke

Danes Dyke is a nature reserve in Yorkshire, known for the wildlife that are here and the fantastic pebble beach.

The coastline here is so special it is actually a protected Site of Special Scientific Interest and its seabird colonies mark it as a Special Protection Area.

Where does it get its name from?

“Danes Dyke Local Nature Reserve acquires its name from the ancient ditch and bank earthwork, which runs through the reserve. Danes Dyke runs for 4km across the whole of the Flamborough Headland, from the nature reserve here in the south to Cat Nab on the Bempton Cliffs in the north. It consists of two constructed features, a flat-topped bank and a west-facing ditch. The bank was constructed from earth, stacked turfs and chalk rubble, much of which would have come from the ditch. Undoubtedly constructed as a defensive feature, it would have posed a formidable barrier, topped with a wooden palisade fence.” – DykesWeb

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It has as really cute pebble beach with red seaweed that always reminds me of the War of the Worlds film with Tom Cruise.

The woodland is also very pretty but also quiet, and peaceful.


Osborne House, Isle of Wight

Around about 2 weeks ago, we visited the popular Osborne house on the Isle of Wight down at the south of England. It took us 12 hours to get to the Isle of Wight in total as we were part of a coach party.

Click on the videos above to see the grounds and house in video.

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Bit of a back story…

“Queen Victoria and Prince Albert bought the Osborne estate on the Isle of Wight in 1845. There they created a private home away from court life. Victoria used Osborne for over 50 years, entertaining foreign royalty and visiting ministers, finding solace there after Albert’s death in 1861. Today, many of the rooms are still filled with original furniture and works of art, while the planting in the grounds is to Albert’s designs.”

English Heritage

This house wasn’t built for them but was owned by a previous family – the Blachford family. The estate came into their hands in 1705 and from 1774-1781, Robert Pope Blachford extended and adapted the existing house and added a walled kitchen garden.

At the time when Victoria and Albert were looking for a seaside resort to relax in, Lady Isabella Blachford owned the Osborne estate. The happy couple leased and then bought the estate in 1845 and 3 years later demolished it because was too small.

If you would like to download a plan of Osborne, click the link below which has been provided by the English Heritage site.

SITE PLAN OSBORNE HOUSE.

Photos taken from English Heritage

Albert died in 1861 away from Osborne house, but Queen Victoria died here in her quarters in 1901.

None of her successors wanted to take on the upkeep so in 1902, Edward VII gave the estate to the nation. Only part of the ground floor was public in 1904 as other parts were transformed into a convalescent home for officers.

In 1903, part of the estate was convertred into a college for naval cadets but years later in 1921, it was closed as Royal Naval College Dartmouth took over.

“In 1933 many of its ‘temporary’ buildings were demolished and thereafter a succession of short-term tenants occupied the site.” – EH.

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Osborne today…

In 1945, Queen Elizabeth II unlocked Victoria and Alberts private rooms after being locked for 44 years. In 1977 the rooms were redecorated.

In 2012 Queen Victoria’s private beach opened and then in 2014, £1.65 million was spent refurbishing the Swiss Cottage.


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Desert Dwellers

Deserts. Many when they think of deserts just think of the heat, maybe camels, mirages of water,…

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Bodnant Garden

So yesterday we visited a place called Bodnant Garden. It is a stunning piece of 80 acre…

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Palak Paneer

So I understand that the picture makes it look rather gross. However, this dish is so nice…

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Japanese Day

Soba Noodle Salad So not that long ago, me and my friends, (following the rules set by…

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Fyfonne Waterfalls

I love looking at waterfalls, hearing the sound of the water as it cascades over big rocks, spying the little water boatmen in the calm spots of the river.

We visited an area of South Wales called Fyfonne Waterfalls.

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It was a beautiful sunny day when we all went, and the sun shone through the trees. It was so quiet as we were passing through the forest, feeling the breeze and hearing the chirps of the birds.

Where I live in the North, we have to travel over an hour to enjoy peace and quiet like this, no cars, no screaming children, no dogs barking. So to enjoy peace and serenity like this was bliss.

After we got to the actual waterfall we decided to go off the beaten track and head up stream past the initial waterfall.

It was steep and the natural forest banking was crumbling in parts so you had to be careful, but delving deeper into the forest it felt like we were on an adventure!

It made me feel very happy being there and I miss it already, I cannot wait to go back! If you get to go, please visit!

Thank you for reading!

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Camping Holidays

Do you like camping? I love it.

I love it even down to the deflated air mattress, the grass in your crocs and the smell of the dew on the grass when you wake up.

We have had so many childhood holidays in tents and caravans. When I say caravans, I don’t mean a static caravan. I mean a tourer caravan. There would be 4 of us in that caravan and our small dog Rollie. At times it was very snugg!

We have travelled all over England, Scotland and Wales in caravans, often staying overnight in a layby if it was a long journey.

Every year we go to a friends farm in South Wales. They are an older couple and we help them out by clearing the polytunnel of weeds or helping clear the land of dead trees.

There’s usually us and 2 other families that go each year. This year it was just us and one other family.

We swam in the sea, saw beautiful waterfalls and trekked through forests. We got to visit places we had never been to before and the weather was beautiful, I got sunburn on my shoulders!

17 days of fun. It flew by!

Evening at Newport Beach

As you can see, I took lots of photos…


Sorry for the short post, I will be honest. I haven’t been feeling very well this week. I am in quite a bit of pain so I haven’t been in the mood to write or sit at my PC for very long but I do hope to get back to writing regularly soon.

Take care!

Talitha x