Danes Dyke

Danes Dyke is a nature reserve in Yorkshire, known for the wildlife that are here and the fantastic pebble beach.

The coastline here is so special it is actually a protected Site of Special Scientific Interest and its seabird colonies mark it as a Special Protection Area.

Where does it get its name from?

“Danes Dyke Local Nature Reserve acquires its name from the ancient ditch and bank earthwork, which runs through the reserve. Danes Dyke runs for 4km across the whole of the Flamborough Headland, from the nature reserve here in the south to Cat Nab on the Bempton Cliffs in the north. It consists of two constructed features, a flat-topped bank and a west-facing ditch. The bank was constructed from earth, stacked turfs and chalk rubble, much of which would have come from the ditch. Undoubtedly constructed as a defensive feature, it would have posed a formidable barrier, topped with a wooden palisade fence.” – DykesWeb

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It has as really cute pebble beach with red seaweed that always reminds me of the War of the Worlds film with Tom Cruise.

The woodland is also very pretty but also quiet, and peaceful.


Global Hunger

I had the idea for this post during my July project: Nature and Us. However as I couldn’t get it to fit in I wanted to make it a separate post all together.

Production of food and drink is a multi billionaire business. Eating is a basic human necessity and yet, despite all the food to go around, all of the food produced each year and the food available on the shelves, millions go hungry.

According to the BBC, as of 2020, 700 million people are going hungry. That number is increasing every year.

A meeting was held in 2019 by a branch of the UN and talks were held about food waste what needs to be done to make changes.

Our actions have consequences

The UN Environment Assembly met on the 11th to the 15th of March 2019. If you are interested in learning everything about this meeting, the records are public and posted here: The Fourth Session of the United Nations Environment Assembly.

In this meeting, they said “

Deeply concerned that approximately one third of the food produced annually in the world for human consumption, equivalent to some 1.3 billion tonnes and representing an approximate value of 990 billion United States dollars, is lost or wasted, while 821 million people suffer from
undernourishment
.”

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Why is so much food wasted?

Well, many reasons could factor but one answer is it goes off before it is used. Life is busy so when you get home after a long day on your feet you are not in the mood to make food for yourself.

There are recipes out there that can use few ingredients and take no more than 15 mins to make.

Find some of these recipes below:

If we can cut down our waste individually, over time it would make a difference globally.


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Nature and Us: Thank you!

Thank you for your support during my project. I have enjoyed doing all the research hand sharing what I have found. I hope you enjoyed it!

I have learnt so many things during this project. I learnt about Forest bathing and the benefits about being surrounded by all that green…

Click the link below to see this post:

(Nature and Us: Forests )

…Jathilda shared he experience and joy with nature as a child. Then…

Click the link below to see this post:

(Nature and Us: Jathilda)

…we discovered how important bugs and beetles are to the eco system! Also, how cute they are!

Click the link below to see this post:

(Nature and US: Bugs and Beetles)

Twitter user Goldfinch shared there love for Nature too by sending a submission in!

Click the link below to see this post:

(Nature and Us: Goldfinch)

The wildlife that depend on the ice caps that exist in Greenland. More importantly, how the icecaps influence the rest of the earth and how they keep a balance. And lastly…

Click the link below to see this post:

(Nature and Us: Frozen )

…the distressing industry of the Shark finning world.

Click the link below to see this post:

(Nature and Us: Shark Fin Soup)

I have really enjoyed this project. I will be honest, I did struggle a little haha but I feel better after learning more about our Earth and ways I can personally help in this.

Is there any project you would be interested in seeing in the future? I would be really interested in hearing your opinion.

Thank you for your reading and subscribing as always, have a great day!!!


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Nature and Us: Frozen

No sorry. I am not talking about The Disney film Frozen. If you were looking for that you’re going to be disappointed. But don’t leave yet! I want to chat about Ice caps.

What is an Ice cap? According to the National Snow and Ice Data Center, it is a dome-like sheet of ice that covers the lands features and it can spread for kilometers in all directions.

Almost 10% of the worlds land mass is covered in frozen water in Glacier’s and ice caps. Why are they so important though, are they useful to the environment? and what is the effect climate change is having on them?

First of all, lets delve into why they are beneficial.

Useful or useless?

There is a paper written by Pal Prestrud for the International Climate and Environmental Research Centre in Oslo, Norway.

They spoke about the importance of snow and ice. Here is a quote from their paper:

The global significance of ice and snow is profound. Less ice, snow and permafrost may amplify global warming in various ways. Melting glaciers and ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica will raise the mean sea level. The retreating sea ice, in combination with increased supply of fresh water from melting glaciers and warmer ocean temperatures, could affect the strength of major ocean currents.

Pal Prestrud

This could spell disaster for many countries who depend on the slow melt from the glaciers, carried by rivers to support their agriculture and domestic water supplies. If their water source just disappears, the people who need this water will suffer greatly.

Animals in Greeenland

Polar bears, Humpback wales, Musk Oxen, Walruses, Reindeer and White,tailed eagles. They all live either on the land, sea or in the air surrounding Greenland.

A White-Tailed Eagle and A Musk Oxen.

I was amazed to find that Greenland has the worlds largest national park, and that actually, the animals have a larger domain than the islanders who live there. Because the park is so big, it means that the animals can roam undisturbed by unwanted human visitors. But despite the paradisiac wilderness, a significant part of the Greenland ice sheet is on the brink of a tipping point. What does this mean?

Melting its ice sheet completely would eventually raise global sea level by 7 metres. In the event this happens, the Netherlands would be completely wiped out. Denmark would become much smaller, the Polynesian islands would be submerged. Miami & Tokyo would be rendered uninhabitable.

As a rule of thumb, for every centimetre rise in global sea level, another 6 million people are exposed to coastal flooding around the planet. On current trends, Greenland ice melting will cause 100 million people to be flooded each year by the end of the century, so 400 million in total due to sea level rise.

Andrew Shepherd. NASA, scientist from university of Leeds. (Source)

So we have covered what they are, why they’re useful and what the affect climate change is having on the glaciers and icecaps. Now, we are going to discuss what can we do to help?

Do your part.

  • Speak up. You can take a stand in protecting the planet by writing to government officials to stop endangering our eco system. You can take action here: Actions | NRDC
  • Reduce water waste. So take shorter showers, turn off the tap if your’e not using it. (The EPA estimates that if just one out of every 100 American homes were fitted with water-efficient fixtures, about 100 million kilowatt-hours of electricity per year would be saved—avoiding 80,000 tons of global warming pollution.)
  • Eat the food you buy…eat less meat. Since livestock products are among the most resource-intensive to produce, eating meat-free meals can make a big difference, too. The amount of in-date food that goes into landfills in America each year could actually feed whole villages in 3rd world countries like India.
  • Walk or bike. Do not drive if you don’t have to. If your destination is 5 mins away in the car, use the opportunity to get the exercise and walk or cycle, if you are able to. You could even make use of public transport!

If you are interested in learning more, head on over to the NRDC website and have a look at the different articles available.

Thank you for listening.


If you would like to join in on this project, head on over to this page to learn more! I would love it if you joined in.

Nature and Us: Gold Finch

I put a tweet out on Twitter and the individual who uses the username @G0ldf1nch replied with their experience with nature. They said:


Although I no longer live by the sea, I grew up by it. It means so much to me.

When I’ve been away from it for a long time, I plunge my hands in the waves first chance I get.

Breaks my heart that we don’t care for it enough.

Originally tweeted by Gold Finch (@g0ldf1nch) on June 27, 2021.

Here is their Twitter: Gold Finch

Thank you for your submission!


To learn how you can join in, head on over to my Nature and Us page or email me at talithatullochsstravels@gmail.com.

Nature and Us: Bugs and Beetles

Apiphobia, mottephobia, spheksophobia. What do these three have in common? They are the names of the three main insect fears, fear of bees, moths and wasps. Why are so many people scared of insects, how important are insects to the eco system and how can we help them?

Why are people afraid of them?

Now it may be as simple as, they have had a bad experience with them. I think everyone has had a bug jump out at them when they least expect it, and yet not everyone will scream when they see another one at a different time. Maybe it’s learnt behaviour. Who knows?

Well according to The Cut, “Psychologists studying disgust, talk about something called the “rejection response” — the overwhelming feeling that you need to get this thing away from you, like, right now. The rejection response, like fear, is a mechanism designed to keep us safe. The presence of insects often indicates that something isn’t safe to consume or touch” and so overtime we have “come to associate the messenger with the threat itself .”

It is a very interesting article and if you’re not too weirded out, I would recommend giving it a good read! Here it is: Insects Are Scary Because Your Brain Confuses Disgust With Fear.

Important to the ecosystem?

The National Geographic has an interesting article and it lists ways they impact and play a part in the environment – They are providers, decomposers, pest controllers and pollinators.

  • Without them, “species that are higher up the food chain suffer population losses.”
  • We know that insects break down waste products, unlocking certain nutrients for other insects, so without them and those unlocked nutrients: “Waste and carrion would persist in ecosystems, impeding the flow of nutrients.”
  • “By feeding on crop-threatening pests, predatory insects perform the role of pesticides without chemicals”. Without them, “Pests proliferate, damaging crops and forests, spurring increased pesticide use.”
  • Did you know that “one out of every three bites of food humans eat relies on animal pollination in the production process.” Without bees and other pollinating insects, “humans and animals lose key food sources.”.

From the article: 5 Vital Roles Insects Play In Our Ecosystem

So how can we help them??

Fun ways for all the family or even just yourself to help can be found listed below. One massive one is STOP using chemicals that kill them!!! No matter how “careful” you may be, they will kill a wide range of insects, not including your intended target.

  • Dig a pond.
  • Plant Native Plants.
  • Make a nectar bar!
  • Compost your waste

Making a nectar bar means including plants in your garden that are rich in nectar. For example Buddleia is well known for attracting nectar feeding insects such as butterflies and hoverflies throughout the summer.

I would love to hear how you are helping our insects. Do you have a bug house in your garden? Do you have flowers? Let me know in the comments and do not be afraid to get involved. To learn how, head to the page : Nature and Us.

Nature and Us: Jathilda

I had a submission last month sent in by Jathilda. It is a beautiful read and I was delighted to receive it. I hope you enjoy it as much I did.


Hardly any topic is as much discussed as environmental matters. Yet there aren´t enough efforts to disburden our beautiful earth. Against this backdrop, it is more important than ever to take action. Whether that might mean buying groceries at your local market, reducing emissions by riding the bike, supporting sustainable businesses or raising awareness for this theme.

The blogger Talitha Tulloch from Talitha’s Travels created a series called #natureandus which revolves around our planet, the breathtaking wonders it´s offering us and how we can give
some eco-friendly love back.


Sometimes we seem to forget what an actual honor it is to live on this planet. How lucky we are to catch a glimpse of nature´s miracles.

I can still remember the moment, when I first experienced my love for nature.


It was 2004, when toddler-me visited my second home, the Philippines, for the first time. My father´s German and my Mother´s Filipina, and although I was born and raised in Germany, I always felt a deeper connection to my Filipino roots. After we had visited our relatives in Manila, we traveled to Boracay, the most breathtaking place I’ve ever been to.

When we got off the plane, our hotel room wasn´t ready yet. We used this spare time to take a break from the flight in an adorable café, which was only a couple of steps away from the beach.

After my mother ordered some beverages, I became very impatient and fidgety. All I could think about was
jumping off my chair and running into the turquoise, sparkling waves. Which is exactly what I did after another five minutes of annoying my mother with my chair acrobatics. Since my bikini was still
locked in a suitcase, all that a café guest could see, was a cheering toddler in Hello Kitty panties, stumbling towards the beach on the most excited pair of legs

The water touched my feet, and in that moment I felt pure, genuine joy. Until today I feel the most happy on the beach.

Beaches fill my heart with bliss and every sense of stress, irritation or
helplessness disappears. Nothing compares to this wonderful bond with nature.


That´s why pictures of coral bleaching, littered beaches and plastic-contaminated oceans are not only making me sad, but furious. The good thing is, that we have still time to turn this ship around.

We can still take actions to make this earth liveable for future generations, to make sure that the waves
of enlightenment hit our children or grandchildren, too.


-Jathilda


Thank you so much Jathilda for your submission! Here are their social media links to find more about them: